The Henry G. Steinbrenner Scholars Program

Henry G. Steinbrenner Scholars Program
Henry G. Steinbrenner Scholars Program

The program will begin on May 23, 2022  and end August 5, 2022.

The mission of The Henry G. Steinbrenner Scholars Program is to train the next generation of neuroscientists focused on developing new treatments and cures for some of the world’s most complex neurological diseases including traumatic brain and spinal cord injuries.

The Henry G. Steinbrenner Scholars Program is a prestigious and professional internship where the students are actively involved in the research and are working directly with the Principal Investigator.  Since its inception, The Miami Project has trained more than 500 post-doctoral fellows, graduate students, and visiting scholars.  These positions provide an opportunity for exceptional students to work in state-of-the-art research laboratories.  Utilizing their knowledge and laboratory skills, students take on specific functions and projects as part of a multidisciplinary team.  By developing undergraduate and graduate students into the fields of science, research, medicine, and engineering, The Miami Project is increasing the number of scientists and laboratories around the world working to obtain the knowledge to initiate new discoveries and clinical trials.

PROGRAM

The Henry G. Steinbrenner Scholars Program is a prestigious 10-week in-person neurotrauma-based summer internship where students actively participate in the research taking place at The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis. These positions provide an opportunity for exceptional students to work in state-of-the-art research laboratories, utilizing their knowledge and laboratory skills to take on specific functions and projects as part of a multidisciplinary team.

The faculty will select 8 to 12 local undergraduate students to participate in the program Monday through Friday, 40 hours per week. Students will be matched with a Miami Project faculty member and will actively work on research projects in his/her laboratory.

In addition, students will attend three weekly one-hour sessions. Monday’s “focus session” will introduce a different area of research, related to spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, or other neuropathology. Content will be reinforced on Wednesdays by way of a one-hour journal club, led by a faculty member or by an appointed post-doctoral fellow or senior graduate student from his/her laboratory. A career development session will be held on Friday mornings to round out each week.

At the end of the 10-week program, students will participate in a special “Henry G. Steinbrenner Scholars Research Day” held on the final day of the program. Students will deliver a short presentation of their research project, followed by a poster session. Faculty, students, post-doctoral fellows, and scientific staff will be invited to attend this event and an award will be presented to the winner of the poster session.

Apply for The Henry G. Steinbrenner Scholars Program

Once your application is submitted, you have until February 1, 2022, to submit the rest of the application components below to: mchagoyen@med.miami.edu

  1. Your resume/cv
  2. A letter of recommendation from your referring professor or academic mentor. (Must be emailed by the Professor/mentor)
  3. Your official transcripts.

Any application missing any of the 3 components above after the February 1st deadline will be considered “incomplete” and will not be considered for the program.

 


REMOTE PROGRAM DURING COVID-19 PANDEMIC

Instead of cancelling the Student Research Intern Program because of the coronavirus and quarantine restrictions, The Miami Project transformed this program to be conducted remotely for the first time in its history.  This year, 54 college students from across the nation, rather than the normal 12 students living in Miami, were able to participate.

The program was held three times a week via Zoom sessions.  The sessions include lectures by the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine’s faculty experts and discussions with scientists who illuminate the breadth of The Miami Project’s research.  Topics include the neurocognitive effects of concussion, pain in neurotrauma, biomedical engineering, and drug discovery.  There are also career development sessions on such essential skills as writing grants and CVs, making effective presentations, and communicating science.