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In the News

John L. Bixby, Ph.D.Doctors Bunge and Bixby publish a paper in SCIENCE that demonstrates postive results for spinal cord repair

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Publications

2014 Fall Project MagazineThe Project, published bi-annually, is the official magazine of The Miami Project and The Buoniconti Fund and are available electronically.  Our Annual Research Review summarizes a selection of research publications from the past year.  Register for our monthly e-news, The Connection.

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Research Achievements

Dr. Diana Cardenas

 

The broad scope of research carried out at The Miami Project has focused on answering questions that help define human spinal cord injury and reveal strategies for the repair of damaged spinal tissue...MORE

 

 

CUTTING EDGE SCIENCE

DOCTORS BUNGE AND BIXBY PUBLISH A PAPER IN SCIENCE THAT DEMONSTRATES POSITIVE RESULTS FOR SPINAL CORD REPAIR

 

May 2015 – Doctors John Bixby, Ph.D., Vice Provost for Research, Professor, Departments of Molecular & Cellular Pharmacology, Neurological Surgery and The  Miami Project, Mary Bartlett Bunge, Ph.D., Christine E. Lynn Distinguished Professor in Neuroscience, Professor, Cell Biology, Neurological Surgery, Neurology and The Miami Project, Michael Norenberg, M.D., Director, Neuropathology, Professor, Department of Pathology, Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Neurology, Neurosurgery, along with Miami Project Electron Microscopy Core Manager Margaret Bates were collaborators on a manuscript that was recently published in the prestigious journal Science. The paper demonstrates that the cancer drug, epothilone, promotes regeneration and locomotor recovery following spinal cord injury (SCI) in adult rats.


“Epothilone offers a novel and exciting new possibility for spinal cord repair---in one, non-invasive step scarring is reduced and axon growth and walking are improved.  I would like to see more work in rat SCI models to test the combination of this agent with Schwann cells transplanted to fill the cavity that forms after contusive injury,” Mary B. Bunge.

 

One of the main barriers to regeneration in the damaged spinal cord is the formation of scar tissue in in and around the injury site.  The paper shows that epothilone reduces the formation of this scar tissue by stabilizing microtubules, which form a scaffold-like structure within the cell, while at the same time promoting regeneration of neuron extensions in the injured spinal cord by fostering axonal growth.  There also was an improvement in walking, which represents another positive development in gaining important knowledge in the field of SCI research.

 

Epothilone has the ability to cross the blood-brain barrier, which makes the administration of this intervention less invasive because it can be introduced systemically instead of through a surgical procedure. This is the first demonstration of an effective treatment in animal models with a microtubule stabilizer that can be delivered systemically. 

 

The publication of this paper is another demonstration of Miller School and Miami Project researchers serving an important role as teachers and mentors to the next generation of neuroscientists.  Lead author Joerg Ruschel, from the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases in Bonn, Germany, learned the injury model /from Dr. Caitlin Hill and performed experiments using local delivery of epothilone while he was a visiting student in the Lemmon-Bixby lab in Miami a few years ago.

 

 

 

Fulll story

 

 

 

 

UPCOMING EVENTS

 

Wednesday - May 6, 2015

Gail F. Beach Memorial Visiting Lectureship Series

12pm

LPLC 7th Floor Apex Auditorium

 

T. George Hornby, PT, PhD

Associate Professor

Dept. of  Physical Therapy
University of Chicago
Research Scientist/Director Locomotor Recovery Laboratory
Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago

 

“Serotonergic Modulation of Motor Function in Human Incomplete SCI”

 


 

 2014-2015 Lecture Schedule

 

 

2014 Fall Project Magazine

 

 

 
 
 
The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis
1095 NW 14th Terrace
Lois Pope LIFE Center
Miami, FL  33136 USA
p. (305) 243-6001 or 1.800.STAND UP
f. (305) 243-6017
e. miamiproject@med.miami.edu
 
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